Comparison of seasons and frequencies of burning in a young slash pine plantation
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Comparison of seasons and frequencies of burning in a young slash pine plantation by Harold E. Grelen

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Published by Southern Forest Experiment Station in New Orleans, La .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Prescribed burning,
  • Slash pine

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementHarold E. Grelen.
SeriesResearch paper SO -- 185.
The Physical Object
Pagination5 p. :
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17617455M
OCLC/WorldCa26982003

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Burning Slash Piles It has been a cold last few days here in Teton Valley, with temps close to zero becoming the norm. With the cold temperatures and the amount of snow we have received, it is the perfect time to start getting ready to burn those piles of leftover yard waste, tree limbs, and other clean combustible items. Impacts Slash pile burning is a common practice in the eastern Sierra Nevada mountains and is often preferred because 1) it can be conducted later in the season than broadcast burning and 2) the impacts on soils and the landscape are limited in aerial extent. However, fires beneath slash piles can be quite intense and may cause substantial. Tests of burning, chopping, and Comparison of seasons and frequencies of burning in a young slash pine plantation. Res. Pap. SO New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment Station. 5 p. [] Grimm, William Cary. Comparison of seasons and frequencies of burning in a young slash pine plantation. Res. Pap. SO [] Grelen, Harold E. Vegetative response to twelve years of seasonal burning on a Louisiana longleaf pine site. Res. Note SO New Orleans, LA: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service, Southern Forest Experiment.

Prescribed burning is an important forest management tool that can be used throughout the life cycle of a stand of trees Burning Longleaf Pine Forests Historically fire frequently moved through the southeastern landscape.   1. Introduction. Wildfire and intentional burning by Native Americans were regular occurrences in the pre-European forests of the southern United States and prescribed fire has been in continuous use since European settlement (Carroll et al., ).Despite this widespread use and decades of research, Christensen () wrote, “The literature on fire is a bit like the holy scripture; by. It was found that the mean soil CO 2 efflux in the plantation was µmol m −2 s −1 in the growing season and µmol m −2 s −1 in the nongrowing season. These values are in the upper part of the range of published soil‐surface CO 2 efflux data. Dominant grasses wereslender little bluestem and pinehill bluestem. One range was treated with asingle fire in late winter or early spring each year. The other rangewas burned a third at a time during each year, one fire in winter (March1), one in spring (May 1), and one in summer (July 1).

The ease and success of planting slash pine have signifi-cantly increased in its range. Extensive planting and natural regeneration of open agricultural and forest land brought a sharp rise in slash pine acreage between and (Sheffield and others ). Much of the planting was on sites that did not favor slash pine, and where performance. Comparison of seasons and frequencies of burning in a young slash pine plantation. Res. Pap. SO New York: McGraw-Hill Book Company, Inc. p. [] McDonnell, Mark J. Old field vegetation height and the dispersal pattern of bird- . If, -however, loblolly pine stands are burned in the fall (September or October), after the trees have undergone their last needle flush of the growing season but prior to the onset of dormancy, research indicates that percent crown scorch is likely to kill them. Slash pine appears to be more tolerant of severe crown scorch during the fall. Burning during the early portion of the growing season usually only top-kills young trees and shrubs, similar to dormant-season burning (McCord et al. , Glitzenstein et al.